Musings on Culture

Alejandra de Leiva's Blog

What is Neorealism? Considerations after the two cuts of the same film

Terminal Station PosterIndiscretion of an American Wife

Anonymous video essayist Kogonada has created a compelling video for Sight & Sound magazine that compares the two cuts of the same film, Terminal Station (1953), an international co-production between Italian director Vittorio De Sica, seminal figure of the Neorealist movement, and David O.Selznick, producer of Hollywood Golden Age classics like Gone with the Wind (1939) and Rebecca (1940).

Terminal Station tells the story of the love affair between Mary, a married American woman (played by Jennifer Jones), and Giovanni, an Italian man (interpreted by Montgomery Clift). The film examines the woman’s guilty feelings for having cheated on her husband and her temptation to leave her old life behind and start anew with her lover. Almost all the film takes place in Rome’s Terminal Station, where the woman has to board a train for Paris and from there fly back to the U.S. But before deciding whether she will catch the train, Mary meets Giovanni at the station. Will she catch the train? (I don’t want to spoil the end here!).

De Sica depicted the lovers’ story against the backdrop of the characters populating the train station, trying to blend Italian Neorealism with Hollywood melodrama to create a greater sense of realism and a believable character study of the protagonists. Neorealist films were distinguished by being shot on location using non-professional actors and unadorned camera techniques. Neorealism had emerged in post-war Italy to reflect, and reflect on, reality, portraying the life of average citizens.

Selznick didn’t like De Sica’s naturalistic approach and he therefore decided to cut 30 minutes of original footage, tooking out subplots to focus on the love story, adding close-up “glamour shots” and a musical prologue. The original release of the film, Terminal Station, ran 89 minutes.  Selznick’s cut was released with the title Indiscretion of an American Wife and ran 63 minutes. De Sica asked that his name be removed from the credits.

In 2003, both films were compiled in a DVD (Indiscretion of an American Wife / Terminal Station (The Criterion Collection)).

In his video-essay, Kogonada compares De Sica’s and Selznick’s versions to explore how the same footage can be manipulated to very different effects, revealing different approachs to moviemaking. You can watch the video HERE.

 Every cut is a form of judgment, whether it takes place on the set or in the editing room. To examine the cuts of a filmmaker is to uncover an approach to cinema.

Complement the video with Dave Kehr’s comparative analysis of Indiscretion of an American Wife & Terminal Station and this critical essay on Italian Neorealism.

For more work by Kogonada, visit his Vimeo channel and follow him on Twitter @kogonada.

Share

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply